Tuesday, February 12, 2019

8 Famous Artists Who Were Self-Taught


8 Famous Artists Who Were Self-Taught

Humans have been making art since the dawn of time, often with little education in materials, techniques, or theory, yet the notion of the “self-taught artist” is a relatively new phenomenon. In order to create art outside of the traditional channels, after all, you first need to create those traditional channels by which we typically mean the established schools and academies that codify art education into defined standards and practices. And in the West, that history largely began in 1635 with the Académie Française, which radically professionalized the art field.

For the next century or at least until 18th-century Enlightenment thinkers ushered in individualism and reason as challenges to tradition and authority - the academy was able to maintain its power and faced little in the way of revolt. But it was only a matter of time before artists in the West questioned these high institutions, and the 19th century provided some of our earliest, most cherished examples of the self-taught artist. This is the era that gave rise to Henri Rousseau and shortly therea after 


Humans have been making art since the dawn of time, often with little education in materials, techniques, or theory, yet the notion of the “self-taught artist” is a relatively new phenomenon. In order to create art outside of the traditional channels, after all, you first need to create those traditional channels - by which we typically mean the established schools and academies that codify art education into defined standards and practices. And in the West, that history largely began in 1635 with the Académie Française, which radically professionalized the art field.

For the next century - or at least until 18th-century Enlightenment thinkers ushered in individualism and reason as challenges to tradition and authority - the academy was able to maintain its power and faced little in the way of revolt. But it was only a matter of time before artists in the West questioned these high institutions, and the 19th century provided some of our earliest, most cherished examples of the self-taught artist. This is the era that gave rise to Henri Rousseau and shortly there thereafter, Vincent van Gogh. The latter received very little formal training, though he had years of experience in the art world; Rousseau may have received none at all. 

Outside of the Western canon, the idea of being self-taught can mean something quite different. Indeed, in some regions of the world, artists who operate outside of any prescribed system are seen as more advanced than professional artists, and the rules and formalities implied by the latter category are seen to stifle creativity altogether. Joanna Williams, professor emerita of Indian and Southeast Asian art at the University of California–Berkeley, has written that the Western concept of a self-taught artist “would sound very odd in China, where the amateur painter, of high social status, (has been) regarded as the model of the ‘genius,’ superior to the mere professional.”

The untrained art-makers that follow, all from the last 150 years, succeeded in making their mark with little or no art school guidance.

Henri Rousseau

An artist who grew up in the era of the French Impressionists and Post- Impressionists, and, Henri Rousseau lacked those artists’ formal training. He only began to paint in earnest in 1884, at age 40. For most of his adult life, he worked as a clerk, earning the nickname “Le Douanier” (“the customs officer”) from critics who sought to discredit the naïve, unschooled painter. Yet it is rumored that the undemanding nature of Rousseau’s job (he never actually made it to the ranking of customs officer) is precisely what gave him the time to teach himself painting; when he wasn’t moving paper, he made trips to the Louvre to sketch from its collection.

Rousseau developed a following, particularly among artists, for what his advocates saw as the directness and lack of pretension in his work, qualities that broke the mold of academic standards. Best known for his vivid, exotic landscapes, Rousseau created dreamlike scenes defined by crystal-clear outlines, and he would come to be loved by the Surrealists Kasper König, co-curator of the 2015 exhibition “The Shadow of the Avant-Garde: Rousseau and the Forgotten Masters” at Museum Folkwang in Essen, Germany, has noted that Rousseau’s genius lay in his ability to avoid the pitfalls of academic composition and naturalistic rendering. “Rousseau wasn’t interested in false illusion,” König stated. “It was about art, not illusion - and that was radical.”

The 20th-century avant-garde recognized Rousseau’s value. By the end of his life, he was exhibiting alongside van Gogh and Paul Gauguin; Henri Matisse and Andre'  Derain, and his work was collected by Pablo Picasso. who later bequeathed several of Rousseau’s paintings to the Louvre.

Humans have been making art since the dawn of time, often with little education in materials, techniques, or theory, yet the notion of the “self-taught artist” is a relatively new phenomenon. In order to create art outside of the traditional channels, after all, you first need to create those traditional channels by which we typically mean the established schools and academies that codify art education into defined standards and practices. And in the West, that history largely began in 1635 with the Académie Française, which radically professionalized the art field.

For the next century or at least until 18th-century Enlightenment thinkers ushered in individualism and reason as challenges to tradition and authority—the academy was able to maintain its power and faced little in the way of revolt. But it was only a matter of time before artists in the West questioned these high institutions, and the 19th century provided some of our earliest, most cherished examples of the self-taught artist. This is the era that gave rise to Henri Rousseau and shortly thereafter, Vincent van Gogh. 

The latter received very little formal training, though he had years of experience in the art world; Rousseau may have received none at all.

Outside of the Western canon, the idea of being self-taught can mean something quite different. Indeed, in some regions of the world, artists who operate outside of any prescribed system are seen as more advanced than professional artists, and the rules and formalities implied by the latter category are seen to stifle creativity altogether. Joanna Williams, professor emerita of Indian and Southeast Asian art at the University of California - Berkeley, has written that the Western concept of a self-taught artist “would sound very odd in China, where the amateur painter, of high social status, (has been) regarded as the model of the ‘genius,’ superior to the mere professional.”

The untrained art-makers that follow, all from the last 150 years, succeeded in making their mark with little or no art school guidance. 

Henri Rousseau

An artist who grew up in the era of the French Impressionist and Post - Impressionists, Henri Rousseau lacked those artists’ formal training. He only began to paint in earnest in 1884, at age 40. For most of his adult life, he worked as a clerk, earning the nickname “Le Douanier” (“the customs officer”) from critics who sought to discredit the naïve, unschooled painter. Yet it is rumored that the undemanding nature of Rousseau’s job (he never actually made it to the ranking of customs officer) is precisely what gave him the time to teach himself painting; when he wasn’t moving paper, he made trips to the Louvre to sketch from its collection.

Rousseau developed a following, particularly among artists, for what his advocates saw as the directness and lack of pretension in his work, qualities that broke the mold of academic standards. Best known for his vivid, exotic landscapes, Rousseau created dreamlike scenes defined by crystal-clear outlines, and he would come to be loved by the Surrealists.

Kasper Konig, co-curator of the 2015 exhibition "The Rousseau and the Forgotten Masters” at Museum Folkwain Essen, Germany, has noted that Rousseau’s genius lay in his ability to avoid the pitfalls of academic composition and naturalistic rendering. “Rousseau wasn’t interested in false illusion,” König stated. “It was about art, not illusion - and that was radical.” 

The 20th-century avant-garde recognized Rousseau’s value. By the end of his life, he was exhibiting alongside van Gogh and Paul Gaugin. after, Vincent van Gogh, 


The latter received very little formal training, though he had years of experience in the art world; Rousseau may have received none at all.

Outside of the Western canon, the idea of being self-taught can mean something quite different. Indeed, in some regions of the world, artists who operate outside of any prescribed system are seen as more advanced than professional artists, and the rules and formalities implied by the latter category are seen to stifle creativity altogether. Joanna Williams, professor emerita of Indian and Southeast Asian art at the University of California - Berkeley, has written that the Western concept of a self-taught artist “would sound very odd in China, where the amateur painter, of high social status, (has been) regarded as the model of the ‘genius,’ superior to the mere professional.”

The untrained art-makers that follow, all from the last 150 years, succeeded in making their mark with little or no art school guidance.

Henri Rousseau

An artist who grew up in the era of the French Impressionist and Post - Impressionists, Henri Rousseau lacked those artists’ formal training. He only began to paint in earnest in 1884, at age 40. For most of his adult life, he worked as a clerk, earning the nickname “Le Douanier” (“the customs officer”) from critics who sought to discredit the naïve, unschooled painter. Yet it is rumored that the undemanding nature of Rousseau’s job (he never actually made it to the ranking of customs officer) is precisely what gave him the time to teach himself painting; when he wasn’t moving paper, he made trips to the Louvre to sketch from its collection.

Rousseau developed a following, particularly among artists, for what his advocates saw as the directness and lack of pretension in his work, qualities that broke the mold of academic standards. Best known for his vivid, exotic landscapes, Rousseau created dreamlike scenes defined by crystal-clear outlines, and he would come to be loved by the Surrealists.

Kasper Konig, co-curator of the 2015 exhibition “The Shadow of the Avant-Garde: Rousseau and the Forgotten Masters” at Museum Folkwain Essen, Germany, has noted that Rousseau’s genius lay in his ability to avoid the pitfalls of academic composition and naturalistic rendering. “Rousseau wasn’t interested in false illusion,” König stated. “It was about art, not illusion --and that was radical.”

The 20th-century avant-garde recognized Rousseau’s value. By the end of his life, he was exhibiting alongside van Gogh and Paul Gaugin.  
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Great Art by Little Known Artists












Thursday, February 7, 2019

The Art of Salvatore Dalhi





Salvator Dalhi 

Salvador Dalí, in full Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dalíy Domenech, was born on May 11th, 1904, in Figueras, Spain. He died January 23rd, 1989, in Figueras Spain. He  was a SurraalisteHeHHHH Spanish painter and printmaker, influential for his explorations of subconscious imagery.

As an art student in Madrid and Barcelonia, Dalí assimalated a vast number of artistic styles and displayed unusual technical facility as a painter. It was not until the late 1920's, however, that two events brought about the development of his mature artistic style: his discovery of Sigmund Fraud's writings on the erotic significance of subconsius imagery and his affiliation with the  Pasis, Surrealists, a group of artists and writers who sought to establish the “greater reality” of the human subconscious over reason. To bring up images from his subconscious mind, Dalí began to induce hallucinatory states in himself by a process he described as “paranoiac critical.”

Once Dalí hit on that method, his painting style matured with extraordinary rapidity, and from 1929 to 1937 he produced the paintings which made him the world’s best-known Surrealist artist. He depicted a dream world in which commonplace objects are juxtaposed, made deformed, or otherwise metamorphosed in a bizarre and irrational fastioned them within bleak sunlit landscapes that were reminiscent of his Catalonia homeland. Perhaps the most famous of those enigmatic images is The Pesistance of Memory - (1931), in which limp melting watches rest in an eerily calm landscape. With the Spanish director Louis Bruie, Dalí made two Surrealistic films' Un Chien andalou (1929; An Aadalusian Dog) and  L’Age d' Âge d or (in 1930; The Golden Age)  that are similarly filled with grotesque but highly suggestive images.

In the late 1930's Dalí switched to painting in a more-academic style under the influence of the Renaissance painter Raphae. His ambivalent political views during the rise of fascism alienated his
Surrealist colleagues, and he was eventually expelled from the group. Thereafter, he spent much of his time designing theat sets, interiors of fashionable shops, and jewelery, as well as exhibiting his genius for flamboyant self-promotional stunts in the United States, where he lived from 1940 to 1955. In the period from 1950 to 1970, Dalí painted many works with religious themes, though he and  his continued to explore erotic subjects, to represent childhood memories, and to use themes central on  Gala. Notwithstanding their technical accomplishments, those later paintings are not as highly Gala regarded as the artist’s earlier works. The most interesting and revealing of Dalí’s books is The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí (1942).


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The Art of Savatore Dalhi

















Wednesday, February 6, 2019

The Episcopal Church





The Episcopal Church Flag

The beginnings of the Church of England, from which The Episcopal Church derives, date to at least the second century, when merchants and other travelers first brought Christianity to England. It is customary to regard St. Augustine of Canterbury's mission to England in 597 as marking the formal beginning of the church under papal authority, as it was to be throughout the Middle Ages.

In its modern form, the church dates from the English Reformation of the 16th century, when royal supremacy was established and the authority of the papacy was repudiated. With the advent of British colonization, the Church of England was established on every continent. In time, these churches gained their independence, but retained connections with the mother church in the Anglican Communion. 

The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church

 (HSEC) is an association of persons and entities dedicated to the preservation and dissemination of information on the history of the Episcopal Church. ​Founded in 1910 as the Church Historical Society, members include scholars, writers, teachers, ministers (lay and ordained), students - anyone with interest in the objectives of the Society.

National Episcopal Historian and Archivists

NEHA provides a forum for exchanging ideas, gives mutual support, and serves as an archival and historical network for any who preserve, explore and share the historical dimensions of the Episcopal Church. Begun as an outgrowth of the Church Historical Society in 1961, NEHA seeks to answer the needs of church leaders who know attention should be given to nurturing congregational, diocesan, and institutional historians, registrars and archivists

                                                 Episcopal Womem's History Project

Statement of purpose: To promote and encourage research, writing and publication in all matters touching upon the history of women in the Episcopal Church; To promote and encourage the collection and preservation of records and other artifacts of interest pertaining to such history; To foster and promote public knowledge of interest in such history.


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Famous Episcopalians


















Sunday, February 3, 2019

The Art of India



The Flag of India
The Republic of India is a country in Asia. It has an area of 3,287,263 square kilometers (1,269,219 sq mi). It is at the center of South Asia. India has more than 1.2 billion (1,210,000,000) people, which is the second largest population in the world population. It is the seventh largest country in the world by area and the largest country in South Asia. It is also the most populous democracy, in the world.
India has seven neighbors: Pakistan in the north-west, China and Nepal China and in the north, Bhutan and Bangladesh in the north-east, Myanmar in the east and Sri Lanka, an island, in the south.
The capital of India is New Delhi. India is a peninsula, bound by the Indian Ocean in the south, the  Arabian Sea on the west and Bay of Bengal in the east. The coastline of India is of about 7,517 km (4,671 mi) long. India has the third largest military force in the world and is also a nuclear weapon state.
India's economy became the world's fastest growing in the G2O developing nation in the last quarter of 2014, replacing the People's Republic of China. India's literacy and wealth are also rising. 
According to New World Wealth, India is the seventh richest country in the world with a total individual wealth of $5.6 trillion. However, it still has many social and economic issues like poverty and corruption.India is a founding member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), and has signed the Kyoto Protocal.
India has the fourth largest number of spoken languages per country in the world, only behind  Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and Nigeria. People of many different religions live there, including the five most popular world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Islam and Christianity. Hinduism,The first three religions came from the Indian subcontinent along with Jainism.
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The Art of India